These Bible Studies are presented free of charge to the public. If these Bible Studies feed you with
spiritual food, it would be a blessing for Rivkah Ministries to receive your tax-deductible donations. You
can send all contrubutions to: Rivkah Ministries; 445-C East Cheyenne Mountain Blvd #322; Colorado
Springs, CO 80906-4570 or you can go or clilck here-> http://www.rivkah.org/contribution.htm
What is the message of Philemon?
“Paul, a prisoner of Jesus Christ, and Timothy our brother, unto Philemon our
dearly beloved, and fellowlabourer”( Philemon 1) .
Tonight we are going to focus merely upon one small book of the
Bible. We are going to discover that the Book of Philemon
masterfully illustrates the power of the Gospel in solving every
conceivable social condition that we can imagine! This tiny book is
only 25 verses long; nevertheless, it is majestic in its portrayal of the
entire scope of the Gospel of Jesus Christ! Paul wrote Philemon
from his prison cell in Rome around the same time that he wrote to
the Colossian Church. The individual named Philemon was a
wealthy citizen of Colossae, and obviously a prominent member of
the church that met in his home. Philemon means affectionate.
We are going to learn that Philemon presents the entire Gospel message
of Jesus Christ in a single book composed of only 25 verses. I venture to
tell you that the Book of Philemon is probably the least referenced book
in the Bible; it is certainly the least referenced book in the New
Testament. Many do not know that during the 4 th and 5 th centuries there
was a great controversy concerning this short letter and whether or not it
should even be included in the pages of the Bible. This short letter was
labeled as unworthy of the Apostle Paul's great mind and considered of
no value for Christian edification. In time, wiser heads prevailed as
Jerome led a successful defense of the Book of Philemon.
Like the small Book of Jude, Philemon is one of those books that is not
composed of multiple chapters and verses; it is so small that it only has
25 verses. However, it is not as if God was looking for material to fill
the pages of yet one more book for the Bible. Indeed, Philemon is an
essential book of Scripture; it amazingly contains the entire powerful
Gospel message. In a nutshell, the book is all about Paul interceding on
behalf of a run-away slave named Onesimus which means “profitable.”
The reason that this book is so significant is that it provides an insight into
Paul’s character unlike any other book of the New Testament! Paul did not
use the Book of Philemon to teach any of his marvelous doctrine in the same
way that he taught grace in the Book of Romans. Nor does he use Philemon
to teach us how to administer the church as he did all the way through the
Written by M. Larry Perrino 1 1/30/2008
2005 by Rivkah Ministries Want to Provide Feedback? – Click http://www.rivkah.org/feedback.htm
These Bible Studies are presented free of charge to the public. If these Bible Studies feed you with
spiritual food, it would be a blessing for Rivkah Ministries to receive your tax-deductible donations. You
can send all contrubutions to: Rivkah Ministries; 445-C East Cheyenne Mountain Blvd #322; Colorado
Springs, CO 80906-4570 or you can go or clilck here-> http://www.rivkah.org/contribution.htm
What is the message of Philemon?
“Paul, a prisoner of Jesus Christ, and Timothy our brother, unto Philemon our
dearly beloved, and fellowlabourer”( Philemon 1) .
letters written to the Corinthians. Philemon is not a book in which one of
Paul’s great revelations are revealed! Instead, Paul illustrates his personal
love for two individuals who were at odds. Paul loved both the run-away
slave and his defrauded master. Paul felt compelled to bring these two
estranged parties back together! Paul did not write this book from his
powerful authoritative apostolic position. Indeed, we marvel at the very
depths of that awesome apostolic authority especially when we consider the
words spoken by the Apostle Peter, “And Ananias hearing these words fell
down, and gave up the ghost : and great fear came on all them that heard
these things ” (Acts 5:5). Paul did not exercise his powerful God-given
apostolic authority; instead, he made a concerted effort to reconcile these two
conflicting individuals!
The New Testament frequently uses the English word “slave,” which usually comes
from the Greek word “ doulos ,” which is also often translated into the word
“servant.” When the Bible portrays an individual acting in the capacity of a
“servant” the resulting English word is usually rendered as the word “minister.”
However, we recognize that there is a difference between a “servant” and a “slave.”
A “servant” is one who is usually privately employed to perform household
services; this is an individual who serves another but often has his own home and
life. This type of servant-hood usually does not include bonds. Indeed, those who
were servants during the Roman empire often chose that lifestyle; and, in many
cases they were actually proud of their lot in life!
On the other hand, a “slave” is one who is bound in servitude to another person and serves
as an implement for labor for his master. This type of “slave” is actually the property of his
master. The Bible says, “Let as many servants as are under the yoke c ount their own
masters worthy of all honour, that the name of God and his doctrine be not blasphemed. 2
And they that have believing masters, let them not despise them, because they are brethren;
but rather do them service, because they are faithful and beloved, partakers of the benefit.
These things teach and exhort” (1 Tim 6:1-2).
These instructions to servants “under the yoke”
indicate a reference to slaves instead of a
privately employed household servant as we
have earlier observed. We should think of this
type of a slave in much the same fashion that
we might view an African slave of early
American history.
The bloodiest war that the United States of
America has ever known was fought because of
Written by M. Larry Perrino 2 1/30/2008
2005 by Rivkah Ministries Want to Provide Feedback? – Click http://www.rivkah.org/feedback.htm
These Bible Studies are presented free of charge to the public. If these Bible Studies feed you with
spiritual food, it would be a blessing for Rivkah Ministries to receive your tax-deductible donations. You
can send all contrubutions to: Rivkah Ministries; 445-C East Cheyenne Mountain Blvd #322; Colorado
Springs, CO 80906-4570 or you can go or clilck here-> http://www.rivkah.org/contribution.htm
What is the message of Philemon?
“Paul, a prisoner of Jesus Christ, and Timothy our brother, unto Philemon our
dearly beloved, and fellowlabourer”( Philemon 1) .
slavery! Slavery in America could not have been eradicated without the physical force of
civil war! We are going to learn that the tiny little Book of Philemon teaches the whole
world that God reforms ailing social conditions such as slavery through the power of love
instead of by physical force! Essentially, there is always a right way and a wrong way to
handle poor social conditions. Philemon reinforces our awareness that God’s way of love
is the most powerful force in the universe. We observe the Apostle Paul standing in for the
lowly slave named Onesimus who could easily and legally have been killed and simply
forgotten.
Despite what many may believe, slavery did not have its origins in the southern states of
America! Slavery where the slave is merely considered as yet another possession of his
master is an age-old long-standing condition! In fact, the Book of Genesis is the first place
where we find the concept of Joseph having been sold into slavery! The key point for us to
grasp during this study of the Book of Philemon is that the Bible has a simple and unique
solution, which is designed to easily resolve every human condition of life!
We cannot allow ourselves to enter into contentious debate or to be confused concerning
God’s will related to the whole issue of slavery. Scripture teaches that we are not to be
caught up in, “doubtful disputations” (Rom 14:1). God gave humanity the ability to bring
about such negative social conditions as human slavery by pronouncing, “let him
( humanity ) have dominion” over the things concerning the earth. Therefore, we cannot
assume that God tacitly approves of slavery just because He has given man dominion over
the earth!
Neither the Old Testament nor the New Testament condemns slavery, nor do either of those
holy scripts call for the abolition of slavery. On the contrary, the New Testament actually
instructs slaves to obey their masters. Notice Paul’s appeal to the slave owner Philemon;
he suggests that it would be a better thing for Philemon to forgive Onesimus for his act of
rebellion, “perhaps he therefore departed for a season,
that thou shouldest receive him for ever; 16 Not now as a
servant, but above a servant, a brother beloved , specially
to me, but how much more unto thee, both in the flesh,
and in the Lord?” (Philem 15-16). Notice that from
God’s perspective, His will is to release those living in
any form of bondage, “The Spirit of the Lord GOD is
upon me; because the LORD hath anointed me to preach
good tidings unto the meek; he hath sent me to bind up
the brokenhearted, to proclaim liberty to the captives,
and the opening of the prison to them that are bound
(Isa 61:1).
We observe in the Old Testament that no Hebrew could
Written by M. Larry Perrino 3 1/30/2008
2005 by Rivkah Ministries Want to Provide Feedback? – Click http://www.rivkah.org/feedback.htm
These Bible Studies are presented free of charge to the public. If these Bible Studies feed you with
spiritual food, it would be a blessing for Rivkah Ministries to receive your tax-deductible donations. You
can send all contrubutions to: Rivkah Ministries; 445-C East Cheyenne Mountain Blvd #322; Colorado
Springs, CO 80906-4570 or you can go or clilck here-> http://www.rivkah.org/contribution.htm
What is the message of Philemon?
“Paul, a prisoner of Jesus Christ, and Timothy our brother, unto Philemon our
dearly beloved, and fellowlabourer”( Philemon 1) .
permanently become the slave of another. Slaves had to be freed when they paid the debt
for which they were sold. It was also true that in the seventh year of their service a slave
had to be released. And when the Year of Jubilee arrived, all slaves were to be set free.
Let’s realize that slavery in the Roman world did not usually entail severe treatment. Slaves
often managed money, guarded children, cooked food, and sometimes were even family
doctors. Our modern society generally associates the word “slave” with the ideas of forced
servitude, which often includes harsh treatment. However, we should not think in those
terms as accurate portrayals of slavery in the Roman Empire.
Slaves were often times accorded the same social status of their owners. Indeed, it was
often difficult to distinguish a slave from a free person. A slave could be a custodian, a
merchant, a salesman, a teacher, or a government official; further, it was not uncommon for
slaves to be highly educated. There were a few slaves who were elders in the church, and
thus exercised spiritual authority over the very masters that they served all week. Indeed,
selling oneself as a slave in that period was commonly used as a means through which
many individuals actually gained Roman citizenship.
Roman slavery in the first century, especially for house servants, was far more humane and
civilized than those horror stories associated with African-American slavery practiced in
the United States prior to the civil war. Nevertheless, this does not suggest that ancient
slavery was not a less-than-acceptable human condition. Slaves were still considered to be
personal property and could be bought and sold and it was always the master’s right to
severely punish his own private property. It actually aids our Bible understanding if we
correctly perceive the nature of slavery in the early New Testament period. That proper
perception aids our understanding as to why the apostles did not simply condemn the whole
condition of slavery.
Instead of condemning slavery, the Apostle Paul taught that believers who were slaves
were to honor, respect, and obey their masters. He taught that Christians could actually
defame the name of Christ if they acted contra wise. Paul realized that if the believer was
the slave of a heathen master, he might be tempted to regard his master as somehow less
than himself. Paul instructed all New Testament believers that any form of high-minded
superiority certainly is misrepresentative of the mind of Christ. Further, Paul carefully
considered the situation where the believer was the slave of a master who was also
Christian. In these circumstances the slave might be tempted to use his Christian
relationship as an excuse to act unfaithful. Therefore, the New Testament teaching is that
any Christian who is a slave does not have the right to be disrespectful regardless of what
kind of master he might have, “Let as many servants as are under the yoke count their own
masters worthy of all honour, that the name of God and his doctrine be not blasphemed. 2
And they that have believing masters, let them not despise them, because they are brethren;
but rather do them service , because they are faithful and beloved, partakers of the benefit”
(1 Tim 6:1-2).
Written by M. Larry Perrino 4 1/30/2008
2005 by Rivkah Ministries Want to Provide Feedback? – Click http://www.rivkah.org/feedback.htm
These Bible Studies are presented free of charge to the public. If these Bible Studies feed you with
spiritual food, it would be a blessing for Rivkah Ministries to receive your tax-deductible donations. You
can send all contrubutions to: Rivkah Ministries; 445-C East Cheyenne Mountain Blvd #322; Colorado
Springs, CO 80906-4570 or you can go or clilck here-> http://www.rivkah.org/contribution.htm
What is the message of Philemon?
“Paul, a prisoner of Jesus Christ, and Timothy our brother, unto Philemon our
dearly beloved, and fellowlabourer”( Philemon 1) .
Nobody knows the circumstances that brought Onesimus into contact with Paul; it may
well have been pangs of conscience for running away. Onesimus obviously remembered
his master's home in Colossae as the location where Christians met for weekly worship.
He also obviously remembered how Philemon highly regarded Paul. When Onesimus
arrived in Rome by some strange “coincidence” Paul too was in Rome. As a result of their
meeting, Onesimus converted to Christ. Paul identified Onesimus as, “ my child, whom I
have begotten in my bonds ,” (Philem 10). In keeping with his name, Onesimus’ service to
Paul became “profitable.” Paul would have gladly kept Onesimus as his own aid; however,
he could not do so without the
knowledge and consent of
Philemon. Therefore, he sent
Onesimus back to Colossae, and
to his master.
For now let’s forget about the
whole controversial issue of
slavery and focus instead upon
what the Holy Spirit would like
for us to learn from this special
Book of Philemon – Let’s begin
by reading this short 25-verses
book:
“1 Paul, a prisoner of Jesus
Christ , and Timothy our brother, unto Philemon our dearly beloved, and fellowlabourer, 2
And to our beloved Apphia, and Archippus our fellowsoldier, and to the church in thy
house :
3 Grace to you, and peace, from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ.
4 I thank my God, making mention of thee always in my prayers, 5 Hearing of thy love and
faith, which thou hast toward the Lord Jesus, and toward all saints; 6 That the
communication of thy faith may become effectual by the acknowledging of every good
thing which is in you in Christ Jesus . ( Perhaps this portion of verse six is the most
regularly quoted passage from this often-overlooked book. ) 7 For we have great joy and
consolation in thy love, because the bowels of the saints are refreshed by thee, brother.
8 Wherefore, though I might be much bold in Christ to enjoin thee that which is
convenient, 9 Yet for love's sake I rather beseech thee, being such an one as Paul the aged,
and now also a prisoner of Jesus Christ. 10 I beseech thee for my son Onesimus, whom I
have begotten in my bonds : 11 Which in time past was to thee unprofitable, but now
profitable to thee and to me:
12 Whom I have sent again: thou therefore receive him , that is, mine own bowels: 13
Whom I would have retained with me, that in thy stead he might have ministered unto me
Written by M. Larry Perrino 5 1/30/2008
2005 by Rivkah Ministries Want to Provide Feedback? – Click http://www.rivkah.org/feedback.htm
These Bible Studies are presented free of charge to the public. If these Bible Studies feed you with
spiritual food, it would be a blessing for Rivkah Ministries to receive your tax-deductible donations. You
can send all contrubutions to: Rivkah Ministries; 445-C East Cheyenne Mountain Blvd #322; Colorado
Springs, CO 80906-4570 or you can go or clilck here-> http://www.rivkah.org/contribution.htm
What is the message of Philemon?
“Paul, a prisoner of Jesus Christ, and Timothy our brother, unto Philemon our
dearly beloved, and fellowlabourer”( Philemon 1) .
in the bonds of the gospel: 14 But without thy mind would I do nothing; that thy benefit
should not be as it were of necessity, but willingly.
15 For perhaps he therefore departed for a season, that thou shouldest receive him for
ever ; 16 Not now as a servant, but above a servant, a brother beloved, specially to me, but
how much more unto thee, both in the flesh, and in the Lord?
17 If thou count me therefore a partner, receive him as myself. 18 If he hath wronged thee,
or oweth thee ought, put that on mine account ; 19 I Paul have written it with mine own
hand, I will repay it: albeit I do not say to thee how thou owest unto me even thine own self
besides. 20 Yea, brother, let me have joy of thee in the Lord: refresh my bowels in the
Lord.
21 Having confidence in thy obedience I wrote unto thee, knowing that thou wilt also do
more than I say. 22 But withal prepare me also a lodging: for I trust that through your
prayers I shall be given unto you.
23 There salute thee Epaphras, my fellowprisoner in Christ Jesus; 24 Marcus, Aristarchus,
Demas, Lucas, my fellowlabourers.
25 The grace of our Lord Jesus Christ be with your spirit. Amen.”
That’s it! That’s all there is to this short letter. Why? Why has the Holy Spirit even
decided to include this short letter within the pages of the Bible? Our answer comes into
focus when we make a simple outline of the events that took place in the story of
Onesimus. Doubtless, he had heard the gospel message while he was a member of
Philemon’s household, before he ran away and ended up in Rome. Nevertheless, he was
not converted by Paul’s teaching in Philemon’s home at Colossae. During Paul's third
missionary trip, he visited Colossae, “after he had spent some time there, he departed, and
went over all the country of Galatia and Phrygia in order, strengthening all the disciples”
(Acts 18:23). Some time after that visit, Onesimus became unprofitable to his master
because he fled. However, as a result of his conversion after he ran into Paul, he actually
became the very thing that his name implies, “profitable,” especially in Paul’s eyes.
Onesimus obviously defrauded his master when we ran away from his service. For this
reason, Paul offered to repay Philemon from his own personal money. For whatever value
it may be, the historical church documents known as the Apostolic Canons (73) identify
that later Philemon actually set Onesimus free. Another historical record, the Apostolic
Constitutions (7:46), teaches that Onesimus was later set apart by Paul to become the
bishop of Berea; it also notes that Onesimus was later martyred in Rome.
But, what are we really supposed to learn from this book? What can we learn from a run-
away slave? We are going to observe ( below ) how an outline of the book is helpful in
releasing a concealed message. Essentially, our outline should certainly include the major
events referred to in the Book of Philemon as follows:
A. Onesimus forsakes his master;
B. Paul finds Onesimus;
Written by M. Larry Perrino 6 1/30/2008
2005 by Rivkah Ministries Want to Provide Feedback? – Click http://www.rivkah.org/feedback.htm
These Bible Studies are presented free of charge to the public. If these Bible Studies feed you with
spiritual food, it would be a blessing for Rivkah Ministries to receive your tax-deductible donations. You
can send all contrubutions to: Rivkah Ministries; 445-C East Cheyenne Mountain Blvd #322; Colorado
Springs, CO 80906-4570 or you can go or clilck here-> http://www.rivkah.org/contribution.htm
What is the message of Philemon?
“Paul, a prisoner of Jesus Christ, and Timothy our brother, unto Philemon our
dearly beloved, and fellowlabourer”( Philemon 1) .
C. Paul identifies with Onesimus;
D. Paul interceded for Onesimus;
E. Paul offered to pay the debt incurred by Onesimus;
F.
Philemon receives Onesimus on Paul’s account; the slave was restored back
into his master’s favor.
Think about it; doesn’t that outline remind you of something more profound that is
recorded throughout the pages of the Bible? Absolutely! This story of Onesimus and
Philemon is the exact identical story of the Gospel and the redemption that Jesus Christ
paid in order to restore the Father’s children back to Him!
Let’s fill in some of the Gospel details of our outline based upon this new perspective:
Humanity ( Onesimus ) forsakes his master: Think about how humanity in the
person of Adam forsook his original master in the Garden of Eden, “Wherefore, as
by one man sin entered into the world, and death by sin; and so death passed
upon all men , for that all have sinned” (Rom 5:12). Since mankind was subject to
sin and death, humanity was essentially stolen away from God or kidnapped from
fellowship with Him, “that they may recover themselves out of the snare
( entrapment or captivity ) of the devil, who are taken captive by him at his will ” (2
Tim 2:26).
Jesus ( Paul ) finds humanity ( Onesimus ): God did not leave humanity in a lost
state; instead, He sent Jesus Christ to the earth to find his lost sons, “For this my son
was dead . . . he was lost, and is found” (Luke 15:24). Whether Paul found
Onesimus or Onesimus found Paul, the ultimate result was the same, “despisest
thou the riches of his goodness and forbearance and longsuffering; not knowing that
the goodness of God leadeth thee to repentance?” (Rom 2:4)
Jesus ( Paul ) identified with humanity ( Onesimus ): “17 If thou count me therefore
a partner, receive him as myself. Jesus identified with our earthly circumstances.
He gave up his godhead and came to earth as the son of man, “we have not an high
priest which cannot be touched with the feeling of our infirmities; but was in all
points tempted like as we are , yet without sin” (Heb 4:15). Jesus took upon himself
flesh and blood; further, He was tempted in all points.
Jesus ( Paul ) interceded for humanity ( Onesimus ): Paul said, “10 I beseech thee
for my son Onesimus, whom I have begotten in my bonds : 11 Which in time past
was to thee unprofitable, but now profitable to thee and to me.” Paul was
essentially interceding for Onesimus. In like fashion, Jesus “ever liveth to make
incercession for us!” We are acceptable to God because of Jesus’ righteousness,
“he hath made him to be sin for us, who knew no sin; that we might be made the
righteousness of God in him” (2 Cor 5:21).
Jesus ( Paul ) offered to pay humanity’s ( Onesimus’ ) debt; “1 8 If he hath
wronged thee, or oweth thee ought, put that on mine account ; 19 I Paul have
written it with mine own hand, I will repay it.” Likewise, Jesus died on the Cross
for us in order to remove our sins and establish a New Covenant between humanity
Written by M. Larry Perrino 7 1/30/2008
2005 by Rivkah Ministries Want to Provide Feedback? – Click http://www.rivkah.org/feedback.htm
These Bible Studies are presented free of charge to the public. If these Bible Studies feed you with
spiritual food, it would be a blessing for Rivkah Ministries to receive your tax-deductible donations. You
can send all contrubutions to: Rivkah Ministries; 445-C East Cheyenne Mountain Blvd #322; Colorado
Springs, CO 80906-4570 or you can go or clilck here-> http://www.rivkah.org/contribution.htm
What is the message of Philemon?
“Paul, a prisoner of Jesus Christ, and Timothy our brother, unto Philemon our
dearly beloved, and fellowlabourer”( Philemon 1) .
and God, “This is the covenant that I will make with them after those days, saith the
Lord, I will put my laws into their hearts, and in their minds will I write them; 17
And their sins and iniquities will I remember no more . 18 Now where remission
of these is, there is no more offering for sin” (Heb 10:16-18).
The father ( Philemon ) receives humanity ( Onesimus ) on Jesus’ ( Paul’s )
account; essentially, the slave is restored back into his master’s favor: We
who were servants of sin are now received back into the favor of God our
father, “God be thanked, that ye were the servants of sin , but ye have obeyed
from the heart that form of doctrine which was delivered you. 18 Being then
made free from sin, ye became the servants of righteousness” (Rom 6:17-18).
Because Jesus became sin for us, the Father does not hold our sins against us!
What is the purpose for the book of Philemon? Essentially, this short little Book of
Philemon encompasses the whole story of the Gospel in only 25 short verses! Just
like the Biblical “Onesimus” each individual Christian who receives the redemptive work
of Jesus Christ will become profitable to the Father as they assume their positions in the
family as sons of God! In the past, each of us were prisoners of sin and death; but, we are
now alive in Christ Jesus!
So, we have discovered that the short letter written by Paul to Philemon is actually an
amazing depiction of the entire Gospel message to humanity. We can now better
understand the passage that says, “Then said I, Lo, I come (in the volume of the book it is
written of me ,) to do thy will, O God” (Heb 10:7). We should be able to find the message
of Jesus and the Gospel on literally every page of the Bible!
Notice the following example of this very idea: The Genesis chapter five account is kind of
dry; it only lists the generations of Noah. What most people do not realize is that the
Gospel message is preached in this particular passage about generations. Notice the
passage as follows: “This is the book of the generations of Adam. In the day that God
created man . . . And Adam lived an hundred and thirty years, and begat a son in his own
likeness, after his image; and called his name Seth . . . 6 And Seth lived an hundred and
five years, and begat Enos . . . 9 And Enos lived ninety years, and begat Cainan . . . 12 And
Cainan lived seventy years, and begat Mahalaleel . . . 15 And Mahalaleel lived sixty and
five years, and begat Jared . . . 18 And Jared lived an hundred sixty and two years, and he
begat Enoch . . . 21 And Enoch lived sixty and five years, and begat Methuselah . . . 25
And Methuselah lived an hundred eighty and seven years, and begat Lamech . . . 28 And
Lamech lived an hundred eighty and two years, and begat a son: 29 And he called his name
Noah, saying, This same shall comfort us” (Gen 5:1-29). Now, how could this passage
possibly teach the Gospel message?
Exactly how can the Gospel message be embedded in the genealogy passage listed in
Genesis Chapter five?” The answer lies in the fact that the names of each individual has a
meaning as noted in the following table. When those meanings are combined they reveal a
hidden message that lies well below the text:
Written by M. Larry Perrino 8 1/30/2008
2005 by Rivkah Ministries Want to Provide Feedback? – Click http://www.rivkah.org/feedback.htm
These Bible Studies are presented free of charge to the public. If these Bible Studies feed you with
spiritual food, it would be a blessing for Rivkah Ministries to receive your tax-deductible donations. You
can send all contrubutions to: Rivkah Ministries; 445-C East Cheyenne Mountain Blvd #322; Colorado
Springs, CO 80906-4570 or you can go or clilck here-> http://www.rivkah.org/contribution.htm
What is the message of Philemon?
“Paul, a prisoner of Jesus Christ, and Timothy our brother, unto Philemon our
dearly beloved, and fellowlabourer”( Philemon 1) .
Genesis Name
Meaning
Scripture or Root Word
Adam
Man
“the LORD God formed man of the dust of the ground, and
breathed into his nostrils the breath of life; and man became
a living soul” (Gen 2:7)
Seth
Appointed
“she bare a son, and called his name Seth: For God, said
she, hath appointed me another seed instead of Abel” (Gen
4:25)
Enosh
Mortal,
Comes from the Hebrew root Anash “to be incurable” often
used of a wound, grief, or sickness that leads to death
Kenan
sorrow
Comes from the Hebrew root word meaning “sorrow”
Mahalalel
the
blessed
God
Comes from the Hebrew roots which when combined mean
“the Blessed God”
Jared
shall come
down
Comes from the Hebrew root yaradh meaning “shall come
down”
Enoch
teaching
Comes from the Hebrew root word for “teaching”
Methuselah
his death
shall
bring
Comes from the Hebrew root muth meaning “to die;” and
from the Hebrew root shalak meaning “to send forth.” The
year that Methuselah died the flood came upon the earth.
Seems to come from the same origin as the English word
“lamentation” which means to despair.
Noah Comfort “And he called his name Noah, saying, This same shall
comfort us” (Gen 5:29)
Now put all of those meanings in to a simple sentence and notice that these names reveal
the Gospel through the hidden message: “Man ( is ) appointed mortal sorrow; ( but ) the
Blessed God shall come down teaching ( that ) His death shall bring the despairing
comfort.”
This sentence that arises out of a combination of the names of the patriarchs up
through Noah pretty much sums up what Paul wrote concerning the Gospel, “God
commendeth his love toward us, in that, while we were yet sinners, Christ died for
us. 9 Much more then, being now justified by his blood, we shall be saved from
wrath through him” (Rom 5:8-9).
The message of Jesus Christ should be detectable on literally every page of the
Bible!
the
despairing
Written by M. Larry Perrino 9 1/30/2008
2005 by Rivkah Ministries Want to Provide Feedback? – Click http://www.rivkah.org/feedback.htm
Lamech
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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What is the message of Philemon?
“Paul, a prisoner of Jesus Christ, and Timothy our brother, unto Philemon our
dearly beloved, and fellowlabourer”( Philemon 1) .
We have observed in the Book of Philemon how Paul openly demonstrated his personal
love for two opposing individuals who were at odds with one another. Nevertheless, Paul
loved both! Therefore, he felt compelled to bring these two estranged parties back into
fellowship! All of these same things are true of our Lord and Master Jesus Christ! The
Book of Philemon is the short story of how Jesus Christ took upon Himself the sins of
humanity in order that they might be reunited with the Father!
Think about it; this short story of Philemon shows us a deeper more profound concept.
Essentially, we learn that the Gospel message all by it self has the power to solve every
conceivable social condition that we can imagine!
The Gospel of Jesus Christ is literally the answer to every single problem that humanity
faces! For further study we recommend the Rivkah Ministries Bible Studies entitled, “The
Blood of the Lamb.” http://www.rivkah.org/PDFs/030227.pdf You can obtain this Bible
Study from the Internet at: http://www.Rivkah.org
Written by M. Larry Perrino 10 1/30/2008
2005 by Rivkah Ministries Want to Provide Feedback? – Click http://www.rivkah.org/feedback.htm